Archives: Exhibits

Human Rights Champions

Courageous People Take Up the Call. Throughout history, brave and visionary people have devoted themselves to fighting for equality, dignity and freedom. This exhibit features portraits of prominent human rights

1950s/Urban South

This exhibit explores life in the 1950s in the Urban South through interactive displays featuring Jim Crow laws and the people in power who vocally and violently enforced segregation. Despite

Freedom Riders

On May 14, 1961 near Anniston, Alabama, a bus carrying Freedom Riders was firebombed. While there were many Freedom Rides prior to this one, the exhibit focuses on this particular

Lunch Counter Sit-In

After learning about the training involved in non-violent protests, visitors are invited to participate in a lunch counter sit-in simulation and place themselves in the shoes of non-violent protestors in

The March on Washington

One of the most iconic and joyful moments of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, the March on Washington gallery is a multimedia experience that highlights the events of the day.

Who, Like Me, Is Threatened?

Human rights issues and abuses affect us all regardless of who we are, where we come from, or what we believe in. This multi-media interactive display invites visitors to contemplate

What are Human Rights?

Simply put, freedom and dignity are basic human rights. Philosophers, clergy and even individuals have their own definitions of dignity and freedom. However, in legal and practical terms, these ideals can

Human Rights in Action

At the heart of all these efforts is respect for human rights, a set of globally accepted standards that are the birthright of all people by virtue of their humanity.

Move, Free, Act

This gallery breaks up the journey between the U.S. Civil Rights Movement and Global Human Rights Movement exhibits, echoing King’s words that “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

Fragments

Fragments is an art installation featuring metal shapes engraved with King’s words in his distinctive handwriting. Designed by Paula Scher and Abbot Miller, the piece captures King’s ideas as they