Law Enforcement Training

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights offers online human rights training for law enforcement personnel — one course for officers and one for leaders.

Our training focuses on how the protection of civil and human rights by law enforcement plays a role in the prevention of human rights abuses. Drawing on experiences from around the world, these online courses:

  • Provide an effective framework to prevent human rights abuses against minority and identity-based groups.
  • Sensitize law enforcement personnel to the systemic features of racism in policing structures as well as the implicit bias that impacts decision-making at an individual level.
  • Examine the factors that put societies at risk for rights violations, especially against minority populations, and provide guidance on detecting and addressing these risk factors.
  • Focus on policies and practices that create a productive relationship between law enforcement and citizens.

TRAINING FOR OFFICERS

Course Structure

  • The course provides eight hours of instruction, delivered over two weeks (four hours per week).
  • Participation is asynchronous — participants work on the course at their own pace.
  • Enrollment is capped at 75 officers per course.
  • Instructors provide feedback on participants’ reflections.
  • Participants receive a certificate upon successful completion.

Week One Curriculum

  • Virtual Tour of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights
  • Promoting and Protecting Civil & Human Rights in Deeply Divided Societies
  • The History of Policing in the United States
  • Overview of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing
  • Citizen Review Boards and Police Reform

Week Two Curriculum

  • Challenges in 21st Century Policing
  • Unpacking Implicit Bias in Policing
  • Becoming Evil: The Psychology of How Ordinary People Commit Atrocities
  • Policing in Traumatized Communities

TRAINING FOR LEADERS

Course Structure

  • The course offers 24 hours of instruction, delivered over six weeks (four hours per week).
  • Participation is asynchronous – participants work on the course at their own pace.
  • Enrollment is capped at 25 leaders per course.
  • Instructors provide feedback on participants’ reflections.
  • Participants receive a certificate upon successful completion.

Week One: Course Introduction

  • Promoting and Protecting Civil and Human Rights in Deeply Divided Societies
  • Why Does Social Identity Matter?
  • How are Social Identities Related to a Deeply Divided Society?
  • Virtual Tour of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights

Week Two: President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing

  • Technology and Social Media (Pillar 3)
  • Community Policing and Crime Reduction (Pillar 4)
  • Training and Education (Pillar 5)

Week Three: Challenges in Community Policing

  • Unpacking Implicit Bias in Policing
  • Policing in Traumatized Communities

Week Four: Impact of Policing Structures on Policing Behavior

  • History of Policing in the United States
  • Becoming Evil: The Psychology of How Ordinary People Commit Atrocities

Week Five: Police Reform

  • Citizen Review Boards and Police Reform (2 hours)
  • Case Studies on Police Reform: Northern Ireland and Camden, NJ

Week Six: Federal Law and Policing

  • An Introduction to Federal Color of Law
  • An Introduction to Hate Crimes Law

Contact Us for More Information

Course Creators

The Auschwitz Institute for the Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities (AIPG) is a non-governmental organization that, through education, training, and technical assistance, supports States to develop or strengthen policies and practices for the prevention of genocide and other mass atrocities. We also encourage and support the cooperation of States through regional and international networks to advance prevention. More than seven decades after the Holocaust, genocide and other mass atrocities remain a threat to world peace and security. Effective genocide prevention requires a multi-dimensional approach to education that is built on the promotion and protection of civil and human rights. The Auschwitz Institute’s programs are carefully designed by experts in the field to provide comprehensive training for policymakers and the security sector to forge networks of cooperation across the globe. You can read about our work and all our programs on the AIPG website.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a museum and human rights institution in Atlanta, Georgia. Our museum’s permanent exhibitions present: US civil rights history, the contemporary struggle for human rights around the world, and the papers and artifacts of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (in partnership with Morehouse College). Our education programs provide schools with curricular and other resource materials that promote critical thinking about US history and its ongoing relevance. Our community engagement programs—conversations, events and performances—bring together experts to address advancing rights, civic participation, and protecting democratic ideals. In our leadership programs, we train police departments on how the promotion and protection of human rights plays a role in the prevention of human rights abuses. We also train corporations, government agencies and nonprofit organizations on how to ensure their workplaces are diverse, equitable and inclusive.