Voice to the Voiceless

The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection gallery features a rotating exhibition of items from The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection, where visitors can view the personal papers and items of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Currently on View

Down Jericho Road: Martin Luther King, Jr. in his Final Year: 

The exhibit takes a look at the work of Dr. King in the last year of his life, as he continued not only to fight for racial equality, but speak out against the violence of war, and the plight of those seeking economic justice and a livable wage. The exhibit also highlights some of his last speeches and sermons, including “The Drum Major Instinct” and “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution.”

Included in this exhibit: Handwritten draft of “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam,” delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, April 30, 1967, and handwritten outline of “The Drum Major Instinct,” delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968

About the Curatorial Team

  • Dr. Vicki Crawford, Ph.D, Director, The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection
  • Sarah Tanner and Aletha Moore, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center
  • Nicole A. Moore, Manager of Education and Museum Content, The National Center of Civil and Human Rights, Inc.

Additional Resources

THIS EXHIBIT INCLUDES

Visit the exhibit located on The Center’s first floor to learn more about the content in these cases. This is just a small sample of what you will find in the “Down Jericho Road: Martin Luther King, Jr. in his Final Year” collection.

"Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution"
  • Text of speech delivered at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1968
'Black Power' and Coalition Politics
  • Various articles on Black Power believed to be with King at the time of his death, including Bayard Rustin’s 1966 article, ‘Black Power’ and Coalition Politics and Vincent Harding’s “Black Power and the American Christ”
Dr. King's Briefcase
  • Given to him for his 36th birthday and with him at the time of his death in 1968.

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