Voice to the Voiceless

The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection gallery features a rotating exhibition of items from The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection, where visitors can view the personal papers and items of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

On Display May 12, 2018 to August 26, 2018

Aftermath of the Assassination

The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, TN was a moment in history for which the world would never be the same.  The remainder of 1968 was filled with the institution of the Equal Housing Act, opposition against the war in Vietnam, the Orangeburg Massacre, the assassination of Robert Kennedy and the institution of The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change.

In the aftermath of the assassination, many grappled with the loss of Dr. King. What became an insurmountable pain for some, was cause for celebration for others. In the end, all were affected in some way by the assassination. As we commemorate the legacy of Dr. King, this exhibit will look at the reactions to King’s death, give further glimpse into the organization of his funeral and show how we as a country came to terms with his absence.

About the Curatorial Team

  • Dr. Vicki Crawford, Ph.D, Director, The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection
  • Sarah Tanner and Aletha Moore, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center
  • Nicole A. Moore, Manager of Education and Museum Content, The National Center of Civil and Human Rights, Inc.

Additional Resources

THIS EXHIBIT INCLUDES

Visit the exhibit located on The Center’s first floor to learn more about the content in these cases. This is just a small sample of what you will find in the “Aftermath of the Assassination” collection.

" Unidentified Correspondence to Coretta Scott King from San Diego, California April 9, 1968"

An anonymous source mocks Coretta Scott King’s appearance at her husband’s funeral, accusing her of trying to be like Jacqueline Kennedy.

"Unidentified Correspondence to Ralph Abernathy from Nixon, Texas, 1968"

A letter to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference suggesting a memorial service that includes some of Dr. King’s favorite songs in the service.

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