#1960Now

Sheila Pree Bright

The Center for Civil and Human Rights Winter 2017 exhibit #1960Now is a photo-essay by local artist Sheila Pree Bright.

Included in the 20 photographs are images from Atlanta, Georgia, Baltimore, Maryland, Ferguson, Missouri and Washington, D.C. The #1960Now project speaks volumes that bring awareness to the ongoing fight for justice and equality, particularly regarding policing in the African American community.

About Sheila Pree Bright

Sheila Pree Bright is an award-winning fine-art photographer nationally known for her photographic series Young AmericansPlastic Bodies and Suburbia. Bright received national attention shortly after earning a M.F.A. in Photography from Georgia State University in 2003. She was awarded the Center Prize from the Santa Fe Center of Photography for Suburbia in 2006 and is a recent winner of the MOCA, GA Working Artist Project Grant 2014.

In the art world, Bright is described as a “ social cultural anthropologist” portraying large-scale works that combine a wide-range of contemporary culture. Late 2013, she went viral on Huffington Post for her Plastic Bodies series, which was featured as a trending topic on the publication’s Art and Culture page. Plastic Bodies also appeared in an important documentary, Through the Lens Darkly, which explores the important role of black photographers. The indie art documentary premiered at Sundance film festival January 2014.

Bright’s most current work, 1960Now, premiered at the Museum of Contemporary Art, GA, September 25, 2015. 1960Now is an evolution in Bright’s exploration through her lens of the Civil Rights movement. Thus far, this project has taken Bright to Atlanta, Selma 50th Anniversary, Baltimore, Ferguson and Washington D.C where she was on the ground documenting the Black Lives movement. The ultimate goal of 1960Now is to encourage the community to think critically and ignite a dialogue of current social issues between all generations.

“1960Now is a participatory and interactive exhibition interpreting intergenerational views of activism through social engaged art. I would like to inspire dialogue that’s most needed in this critical moment in our country between races, genders and generations.”

– Sheila Pree Bright

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